Mobster John Pennisi said spirit of his grandparents told him to turn rat

It was a ghost he couldn’t refuse.

Luchese mobster John Pennisi says he got an earth-shaking message from the great beyond via his deceased grandparents that convinced him to become a government turncoat.

The paranormal message came to him in his Long Island home just as he was praying before a photo of his late grandparents and seeking their advice about whether he should turn informant, he said in a recent podcast. Just at that moment, Pennisi says he heard a sudden loud rattling of dishes and glasses. “Everything was shaking in the house,” Pennisi told podcaster Gary Jenkins.

That was the sign, Pennisi said, that convinced him to turn himself into the FBI in October 2018.

In the three trials where he has testified since becoming a government witness, Pennisi has never mentioned his poltergeist-style encounter. In his sworn testimony, Pennisi has said he flipped after Luchese family leaders wrongly tagged him as a “rat.”

In the podcast, Pennisi also offered dramatic new details on attempts on his life that he believes had been ordered by his former Luchese allies. Shortly before receiving the supernatural message from the Other Side, he was chased by “five or six Bloods” at a Manhattan job site. Pennisi said the hoodlums were laying in wait to kill him for the Lucheses.

John Pennisi turned himself to the FBI three years ago.
John Pennisi, left, turned himself into the FBI three years ago.
Jerry Capeci/Ganglandnews

“I couldn’t believe the level of disrespect they had stooped to,” Pennisi said. He said the Luchese clan “had started using other ethnic groups. They began using the Bloods.”
On another occasion, he said, he had chased off another group of Bloods with “a pistol in a knapsack.”

Those encounters, he said, underscored his uneasiness due to mixed messages he was getting from the family’s acting boss, Michael (Big Mike) DeSantis.

Pennisi, who had recently moved, said, “I started seeing people laying around at the train stations in the new town that I lived in.”

He said that when a cousin suggested he go to the FBI, he rejected that notion. But his son suggested they “write down the pros and cons” of the options he faced.

“As a last resort,” said Pennisi, they wrote down the FBI. “That was the other option. It was the first time that I even thought of the government or the FBI. We had to put that down as a last resort.”

Pennisi said his son, who “lost 17 years without his father” during the years Pennisi was in prison for killing a neighborhood rival, “was a nervous wreck.” Pennisi said his son “knew I was either going to go to jail for the rest of my life, get killed or I’m going to be in some type of a war with these guys and I’m on the losing end. I’m one person. And he told me, ‘I think that you should go tomorrow,’ and it was a Thursday. And I said, ‘All right.’ So he left.”

Pennisi said he felt “sick to my stomach” from Friday to Sunday and “couldn’t do it.” But on Monday morning he woke up and prayed to his grandparents who “had passed away” for guidance.

The front page of Friday's Post.
The Post front page on June 4, 2021.

“I didn’t live by a train station,” Pennisi said. “You had to walk [there].) There was no planes flying around. It wasn’t an earthquake. Gary, I swear to you, I had wine glasses and different glasses and dishes in the house. Everything was shaking in the house,” he said in a high-pitched voice, imitating the sound of glasses clicking, “bing bing bing bing bing bing.”

“I even called my mother up, and I says, ‘I want you to listen to something.’ This went on for hours. She says, ‘What is that?’ I says, ‘It’s the glasses. I prayed to Grandma and Grandpa. It’s the glasses and the dishes and the house is shaking.’ Gary, I can’t even explain it. And THAT was my sign to go.”

Two attorneys who represent defendants against whom Pennisi testified said they should have been able to ask him about his strange encounters with the great beyond in front of a jury.

“It is simply inexcusable that the defense was never told about . . . the paranormal events that he claimed triggered his cooperation,” said Anthony DiPietro, the attorney for convicted underboss Steven “Stevie Wonder” Crea.

“Had these materials, and many other things now revealed by Pennisi, been properly disclosed by the government, no grand jury or trial jury would ever credit his tales,” said DiPietro.

Luchese turncoat mobster John Pennisi says he got an earth-shaking message from the great beyond via his deceased grandparents that convinced him to become a government cooperator.
John Pennisi claims everything was shaking in his home and it felt similar to an earthquake.
vladtv/YouTube

“His capitalizing on his cooperation calls into question his prior testimony and his motives to fabricate now.”

Lawyer Gerald McMahon, who saw Pennisi testify against his client, Eugene “Boobsie” Castelle, had his own take on the new explanation by the government informant. On the witness stand, Pennisi testified that John “Big John” Castellucci made up the claim Pennisi was a “rat” to protect Boobsie from being ostracized or worse for violating mob protocol and sleeping with Pennisi’s girlfriend.

“With the recent spate of videos of UFO sightings that the Air Force and government are saying are the real thing,” said McMahon, “there’s a bit of poetry and symmetry in his account. I swear to God,” said the lawyer, “that in one of those videos I thought I saw Pennisi with a helmet on. This confirms that it was in fact Pennisi traveling from a distant galaxy far, far away.”

Jerry Capeci runs Ganglandnews.com, from which this was adapted.

This article was originally posted here

Cosa ghostra: Mobster said spirit of his grandparents told him to turn rat

It was a ghost he couldn’t refuse.

Luchese mobster John Pennisi says he got an earth-shaking message from the great beyond via his deceased grandparents that convinced him to become a government turncoat.

The paranormal message came to him in his Long Island home just as he was praying before a photo of his late grandparents and seeking their advice about whether he should turn informant, he said in a recent podcast. Just at that moment, Pennisi says he heard a sudden loud rattling of dishes and glasses. “Everything was shaking in the house,” Pennisi told podcaster Gary Jenkins.

That was the sign, Pennisi said, that convinced him to turn himself into the FBI in October 2018.

In the three trials where he has testified since becoming a government witness, Pennisi has never mentioned his poltergeist-style encounter. In his sworn testimony, Pennisi has said he flipped after Luchese family leaders wrongly tagged him as a “rat.”

In the podcast, Pennisi also offered dramatic new details on attempts on his life that he believes had been ordered by his former Luchese allies. Shortly before receiving the supernatural message from the Other Side, he was chased by “five or six Bloods” at a Manhattan job site. Pennisi said the hoodlums were laying in wait to kill him for the Lucheses.

John Pennisi turned himself to the FBI three years ago.
John Pennisi, left, turned himself into the FBI three years ago.
Jerry Capeci/Ganglandnews

“I couldn’t believe the level of disrespect they had stooped to,” Pennisi said. He said the Luchese clan “had started using other ethnic groups. They began using the Bloods.”
On another occasion, he said, he had chased off another group of Bloods with “a pistol in a knapsack.”

Those encounters, he said, underscored his uneasiness due to mixed messages he was getting from the family’s acting boss, Michael (Big Mike) DeSantis.

Pennisi, who had recently moved, said, “I started seeing people laying around at the train stations in the new town that I lived in.”

He said that when a cousin suggested he go to the FBI, he rejected that notion. But his son suggested they “write down the pros and cons” of the options he faced.

“As a last resort,” said Pennisi, they wrote down the FBI. “That was the other option. It was the first time that I even thought of the government or the FBI. We had to put that down as a last resort.”

Pennisi said his son, who “lost 17 years without his father” during the years Pennisi was in prison for killing a neighborhood rival, “was a nervous wreck.” Pennisi said his son “knew I was either going to go to jail for the rest of my life, get killed or I’m going to be in some type of a war with these guys and I’m on the losing end. I’m one person. And he told me, ‘I think that you should go tomorrow,’ and it was a Thursday. And I said, ‘All right.’ So he left.”

Pennisi said he felt “sick to my stomach” from Friday to Sunday and “couldn’t do it.” But on Monday morning he woke up and prayed to his grandparents who “had passed away” for guidance.

The front page of Friday's Post.
The Post front page on June 4, 2021.

“I didn’t live by a train station,” Pennisi said. “You had to walk [there].) There was no planes flying around. It wasn’t an earthquake. Gary, I swear to you, I had wine glasses and different glasses and dishes in the house. Everything was shaking in the house,” he said in a high-pitched voice, imitating the sound of glasses clicking, “bing bing bing bing bing bing.”

“I even called my mother up, and I says, ‘I want you to listen to something.’ This went on for hours. She says, ‘What is that?’ I says, ‘It’s the glasses. I prayed to Grandma and Grandpa. It’s the glasses and the dishes and the house is shaking.’ Gary, I can’t even explain it. And THAT was my sign to go.”

Two attorneys who represent defendants against whom Pennisi testified said they should have been able to ask him about his strange encounters with the great beyond in front of a jury.

“It is simply inexcusable that the defense was never told about . . . the paranormal events that he claimed triggered his cooperation,” said Anthony DiPietro, the attorney for convicted underboss Steven “Stevie Wonder” Crea.

“Had these materials, and many other things now revealed by Pennisi, been properly disclosed by the government, no grand jury or trial jury would ever credit his tales,” said DiPietro.

Luchese turncoat mobster John Pennisi says he got an earth-shaking message from the great beyond via his deceased grandparents that convinced him to become a government cooperator.
John Pennisi claims everything was shaking in his home and it felt similar to an earthquake.
vladtv/YouTube

“His capitalizing on his cooperation calls into question his prior testimony and his motives to fabricate now.”

Lawyer Gerald McMahon, who saw Pennisi testify against his client, Eugene “Boobsie” Castelle, had his own take on the new explanation by the government informant. On the witness stand, Pennisi testified that John “Big John” Castellucci made up the claim Pennisi was a “rat” to protect Boobsie from being ostracized or worse for violating mob protocol and sleeping with Pennisi’s girlfriend.

“With the recent spate of videos of UFO sightings that the Air Force and government are saying are the real thing,” said McMahon, “there’s a bit of poetry and symmetry in his account. I swear to God,” said the lawyer, “that in one of those videos I thought I saw Pennisi with a helmet on. This confirms that it was in fact Pennisi traveling from a distant galaxy far, far away.”

Jerry Capeci runs Ganglandnews.com, from which this was adapted.

This article was originally posted here

Mafia killer involved in 100 slayings who dissolved victim in acid released from prison

A notorious Sicilian Mafia killer dubbed the “people slayer” — who admitted to a role in more than 100 killings, including a boy who was dissolved in acid — was freed from Italian prison Monday after serving just 25 years.

Giovanni Brusca, 64, who turned from La Cosa Nostra hitman to government informant was cut loose from Rome’s Rebibbia prison, sparking outrage from elected officials and the families of his victims, the BBC reported.

The notorious killer had a hand in several of the Italian mafia’s most infamous slayings, including the 1992 rubout of anti-mafia Judge Giovanni Falcone, who was blown up along with his wife and three bodyguards as they were driving near Palermo.

Brusca also ordered the killing of 11-year-old Giuseppe Di Matteo, the son of a rival gangster. He had the boy kidnapped, tortured, strangled and his body desolved in acid, the BBC reported.

The wife of one of the bodyguards killed in the 1992 bomb blast told the Repubblica newspaper that she was incensed by his release after more than two decades behind bars.

“The state is against us — after 29 years we still don’t know the truth about the massacre and Giovanni Brusca, the man who destroyed my family, is free,” Tina Montinaro told the outlet.

An undated photo of Giovanni Brusca (C) in Sicily, Italy (issued 01 June 2021). Brusca, 64, was released from Rome's Rebibbia prison on 31 June 2021 after 25 years in jail, having served all but 45 days of his sentence. Brusca was arrested in May 1996 and sentenced to life for over 100 murders, including that of anti-Mafia prosecutor Giovanni Falcone, his wife Francesca Morvillo and three police officers in May 1992.
Giovanni Brusca was notorious for killing rival gangsters and their families.
MIKE PALAZZOTTO/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Political leaders from across the spectrum also condemned his release.

“This is not the ‘justice’ that Italians deserve,” said Matteo Salvini, leader of the right-wing League party, according to the BBC.

“It is a punch in the stomach that leaves you breathless,” Enrico Letta, the leader of the country’s Democratic party, added to a local radio station.

This article was originally posted here

Notorious Italian Mafia killer known as the ‘people slayer’ released from prison

A notorious Sicilian Mafia killer dubbed the “people slayer” — who admitted to a role in more than 100 killings, including a boy who was dissolved in acid — was freed from Italian prison Monday after serving just 25 years.

Giovanni Brusca, 64, who turned from La Cosa Nostra hitman to government informant was cut loose from Rome’s Rebibbia prison, sparking outrage from elected officials and the families of his victims, the BBC reported.

The notorious killer had a hand in several of the Italian mafia’s most infamous slayings, including the 1992 rubout of anti-mafia Judge Giovanni Falcone, who was blown up along with his wife and three bodyguards as they were driving near Palermo.

Brusca also ordered the killing of 11-year-old Giuseppe Di Matteo, the son of a rival gangster. He had the boy kidnapped, tortured, strangled and his body desolved in acid, the BBC reported.

The wife of one of the bodyguards killed in the 1992 bomb blast told the Repubblica newspaper that she was incensed by his release after more than two decades behind bars.

“The state is against us — after 29 years we still don’t know the truth about the massacre and Giovanni Brusca, the man who destroyed my family, is free,” Tina Montinaro told the outlet.

An undated photo of Giovanni Brusca (C) in Sicily, Italy (issued 01 June 2021). Brusca, 64, was released from Rome's Rebibbia prison on 31 June 2021 after 25 years in jail, having served all but 45 days of his sentence. Brusca was arrested in May 1996 and sentenced to life for over 100 murders, including that of anti-Mafia prosecutor Giovanni Falcone, his wife Francesca Morvillo and three police officers in May 1992.
Giovanni Brusca was notorious for killing rival gangsters and their families.
MIKE PALAZZOTTO/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Political leaders from across the spectrum also condemned his release.

“This is not the ‘justice’ that Italians deserve,” said Matteo Salvini, leader of the right-wing League party, according to the BBC.

“It is a punch in the stomach that leaves you breathless,” Enrico Letta, the leader of the country’s Democratic party, added to a local radio station.

This article was originally posted here

Mexico raffling off El Chapo’s mansions, Aztec Stadium luxury box

Mexican authorities are raffling off jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s ritzy holdings, including multi-million dollar mansions and a luxury box at Aztec Stadium, according to a report.

The “mega raffle,” scheduled for Sept. 15, will peddle 22 of the kingpin’s properties, valued at about $12.5 million, Mexico News Daily said.

Among the prizes up for sale is El Chapo’s 10,000-square-foot estate in Tlalpan, valued at nearly $4 million, which comes with nine bedrooms, an indoor pool, jacuzzis, a wine cellar and a party salon, the outlet said.

Also on the market is a more modest $200,000 home in Sinaloa, which features the bathtub from which the former drug lord dug his way to freedom to elude the Mexican navy in 2014.

Then there’s the 20-seat luxury box at Mexico City’s Aztec Stadium, described as being in “an excellent location” at the venue.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico’s most notorious drug lord, is arrested in the beach resort town of Mazatlan, Mexico on Feb. 22, 2014.
Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Mexico’s most notorious drug lord, is arrested in the beach resort town of Mazatlan, Mexico on Feb. 22, 2014.
AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo
A bid assistant celebrates a bid for a corvette owned by "El Chapo" during an auction in Mexico City on Nov. 10, 2019.
A bid assistant celebrates a bid for a corvette owned by “El Chapo” during an auction in Mexico City on Nov. 10, 2019.
AP Photo/Anthony Vazquez
Bidders call their prices for a house onced owned by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman during an auction in Mexico City on Nov. 10, 2019.
Bidders call their prices for a house onced owned by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman during an auction in Mexico City on Nov. 10, 2019.
AP Photo/Anthony Vazquez

The box, valued at more than $1 million and good through 2065, is where former Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid handed Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona the World Cup trophy after Argentina’s victory in 1986, the paper said.

“Selling properties, residences, even a box that the government had in the Aztec Stadium, all of that is going to be delivered to the people,” Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said at a press conference last week. “And help purchase vaccines and medicine and given away as scholarships.”

Guzman, once one of the most notorious and elusive of Mexico’s drug kingpins, was extradited to the US and convicted in 2019 on numerous charges related to his sprawling drug trafficking enterprise.

One of the six houses once owned by notorious drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.
One of the six houses once owned by notorious drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
Government of Mexico
Mexican authorities plan to raffle large mansions onced owned by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.
Mexican authorities plan to raffle large mansions onced owned by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
Government of Mexico
One of the six houses once owned by notorious drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.
One of the six houses once owned by notorious drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
Government of Mexico
One house owned by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman appears deserted and in need of repair.
One house owned by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman appears deserted and in need of repair.
Government of Mexico
Mexican authorities plan to raffle large mansions onced owned by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.
Mexican authorities plan to raffle large mansions onced owned by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.
Government of Mexico

He is now serving out his sentence at a supermax prison in Colorado.

This article was originally posted here

Most-wanted mafia boss Rocco Morabito arrested in Brazil years after 2019 prison escape

On Monday, Brazil’s Federal Police arrested one of Italy’s most-wanted mobsters, putting an end to a years-long international chase after Rocco Morabito, a prominent member of one of the world’s most powerful crime syndicates, the ‘Ndrangheta.

After having been on the run for 22 years and escaping jail in 2019, Brazilian agents arrested Morabito, 54, in a hotel in the northeastern city of João Pessoa. The member of the Morabito clan, one of the many families within the ‘Ndrangheta mafia, was sentenced in Italy to 30 year years in prison.

Authorities also apprehended another Italian citizen identified as Vincenzo Pasquino who, like Morabito, will face extradition.

The ‘Ndrangheta clan chief has allegedly trafficked drugs from Brazil to Europe since the 90s, according to police investigations. Officials also said that recent operations revealed the syndicate’s links to Brazilian criminal groups.

Morabito was first arrested in Uruguay in 2017 but two years later managed to break out of a prison in Montevideo in a spectacular escape that occurred just before he was about to be extradited to Italy. An investigation later found that another ‘Ndrangheta member bribed guards with 50,000 euros (US$61,000).

Originally from Africo, a small town in the southern region of Calabria, the Morabito family became one of the most powerful clans involved in international drugs and weapons trafficking in the 90s.

Giuseppe Morabito, nicknamed U’Tiradrittu (“The straight shooter”), is the historical boss of the family clan known for taking over the drug business in Milan and other northern areas of Italy and Europe.

Rocco Morabito, a cousin of U’Tiradrittu, has been often referred to as ‘Milan’s cocaine king’ for heading the clan’s coke imports from Latin America to Europe.

After Milan, Morabito reportedly settled in Fortaleza, Brazil, before he moved to Uruguay, where he lived in a luxurious villa and used a fake identity for at least a decade before his first arrest. After escaping, he relocated to Brazil.

Italian authorities celebrated the apprehension of Morabito and applauded the Cooperation Against ‘Ndrangheta (I-CAN) project, a three-year initiative promoted and financed by the Ministry of the Interior and led by Interpol that targeted the syndicate and its illegal interests.

“Once again, the determination, dedication and professionalism of all the investigators involved have made it possible to bring to justice, after two years of complex and detailed investigations, the leading exponent of the ‘Ndrangheta – considered the second most dangerous fugitive after Matteo Messina Denaro,” said Italy’s Minister of the Interior, Luciana Lamorgese.

Original source here.

This article was originally posted “here

Hoffa Tipster Chuckie Crimaldi Died In Hiding In Texas, Chicago Mob Hit Man Linked Teamsters Boss’ Murder To CIA

May 27, 2021 – The mobster who told the FBI that the CIA killed Teamsters chief Jimmy Hoffa died last year while living in Texas under an assumed identity in the Witness Protection Program. The pop-culture soaked Hoffa murder case remains unsolved 46 years and running.

Turncoat Chicago mob hit man Chuckie Crimaldi died of natural causes on August 1, 2020 in Austin, Texas, according to sources in federal law enforcement. He was 87. For the past four decades, Crimaldi had been known to those around him as Chuck Cazzola. In 1976, he co-wrote the book, Crimaldi, Contract Killer with journalist John Kidner.

During his tenure working for the mob, Crimaldi’s name surfaced in multiple iconic mob affairs, including the Hoffa kidnapping and murder, the JFK assassination plot and Operation Mongoose, the alliance made between the CIA and the mafia in the 1960s to try to kill Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. When he flipped in 1971, Crimaldi helped the feds build a murder case against “Casino” mob chief Tony (The Ant) Spilotro and the Chicago Outfit’s DeStefano brothers for the 1963 gangland slaying of a Jewish loan shark named Leo Foreman. He also aided the government in narcotics and extortion probes.

Crimaldi worked for Salvatore (Mad Sam) DeStefano, the sociopathic Outfit hit man and juice loan king, who also taught Spilotro how to kill for the mob. Tony the Ant, the Chicago mafia’s point man in Las Vegas, was acquitted of the charges, Mad Sam was murdered himself during the course of the case and his brother, Mario, eventually the only one found guilty of the Foreman homicide.

Spilotro and his baby brother Mickey were brutally beaten, stomped and strangled in a suburban Chicagoland basement in June 1986 after Tony the Ant’s behavior went off the rails in Vegas. Tony the Ant was the top suspect in the DeStefano hit.

Crimaldi was often farmed out by Mad Sam to Outfit boss Sam (Momo) Giancana for his personal use on hits the Chicago crime family deemed essential. Giancana and labor boss Jimmy Hoffa worked together with the CIA in its attempt to oust Fidel Castro from power in Cuba by any means necessary. The mob in America lost millions of dollars in Cuban banks and financial institutions upon Castro and his revolutionaries seizing power in a 1959 coup.

Based in Detroit, Hoffa rose to the Teamsters presidency in 1957 and opened the door for the mafia to raid the union’s pension fund to finance business investments in places like Las Vegas, Atlantic City, New York, Florida and California. Giancana was shot dead inside his Chicago home in May 1975. Hoffa vanished from a suburban Detroit restaurant parking lot on July 30, 1975 following a falling out with his benefactors in the mob over The Commission’s decision to put the fiery rabblerouser out to pasture and demand he retire from union affairs. Nobody has ever been charged in either the Giancana or Hoffa murders.

Crimaldi connects both high-profile hits to the CIA. Giancana and Hoffa were scheduled to testify at the Church Committee Hearings on the CIA’s efforts to covertly eliminate Castro and turn Cuba democratic. Hoffa was the conduit between the mafia and the CIA, per Crimaldi.

“For a hit man, he was a pretty pleasant guy,” said author Dan Moldea of his memories of interviewing Crimaldi in the 1970s as part of his groundbreaking research into the Hoffa case. “I’m shocked he was still alive all this time. He was a smart criminal, not a knuckle dragger.”

This article was originally posted here

Organized crime leader Raynald Desjardins back behind bars

Article content

It took Mob boss Raynald Desjardins a little more than a month to be returned behind bars for an alleged breach of one of his release conditions as he continues to serve a sentence for conspiring to murder a Montreal Mafia leader.

A Laval police spokesperson confirmed the police force arrested Desjardins last week on a request from Correctional Service Canada.

Desjardins is serving a 78-month prison term he was left with after he pleaded guilty to having conspired to kill Salvatore Montagna. The Mafia leader was killed on Nov. 24, 2011. Desjardins received an overall sentence of 14 years in 2016, but when the time he had already served was factored in, he was left the 78-month prison term he is currently serving.

Months before Montagna was killed, Desjardins was being investigated in a drug trafficking probe and the RCMP learned that he and Montagna were trying to work together to take control of the Mafia in Montreal, while Vito Rizzuto was incarcerated in the U.S., but they had a falling out early in 2011. In September 2011, someone tried to kill Desjardins in Laval and the RCMP learned that Desjardins reacted by plotting to kill Montagna.

Article content

Desjardins was not previously granted parole and he therefore automatically qualified for an automatic release, on April 15, when he reached the two-thirds mark of the sentence.

One of the conditions attached to the release by the Parole Board of Canada was the requirement that he “not meet or communicate non-incidentally with people whom you know are involved or suspect to be involved or know have been involved in criminal activities and/or (tied to drug trafficking).”

Correctional Service Canada and the Parole Board of Canada would not comment on the reasons behind Desjardins’s arrest. According to a report published by La Presse, Desjardins breached the condition by associating with Jean-Charles Denommé, 32, a man who was convicted, in 2014, following a large-scale drug trafficking investigation dubbed Project Carcan. The report quotes anonymous sources who said Denommé appeared to be acting as Desjardins’s bodyguard.

Article content

Denommé, who was considered the leader of the drug trafficking network targeted in Project Carcan, was caught with a loaded firearm when he was first arrested in the probe in 2011 and he was caught carrying another firearm while he was out on bail in 2013.

The following year, Denommé pleaded guilty to the drug trafficking and weapons charges filed against him in Project Carcan as well as charges related to how he continued dealing in cocaine while out on bail. He was sentenced to a 10-year prison term.

In 2019, when the Parole Board of Canada turned down Denommé for both day and full parole, he was described as a former associate of the Hells Angels. A written summary of that decision describes how he was turned down for a release, in part, because guards suspected Denommé was using drones to smuggle contraband into a penitentiary.

When Denommé reached his statutory release date, in October last year, the parole board imposed a similar condition on him, ordering that he not associate with people tied to organized crime. According to La Presse, his statutory release was also suspended.

Desjardins’s release is currently suspended and it will likely be up to the Parole Board of Canada to determine whether it will be revoked.

This article was originally posted here

Italian mobster known as ‘Cocaine King of Milan’ busted in Brazil years after prison escape

Italy’s reputed “Cocaine King of Milan” has been busted in Brazil, two years after he escaped from a South American prison through a hole in the roof, officials said.

Rocco Morabito, 54, who is allegedly the boss of the Calabrian ’Ndrangheta organized crime syndicate, is now awaiting extradition back to his native Italy, where he has been wanted since 1994, the Italian Interior Ministry said Tuesday.

Morabito’s arrest comes after he avoided being sent back home in 2019, when he escaped from a Uruguayan prison.

Italian drug trafficking suspect Vincenzo Pasquino was arrested along with Morabito in a hotel room in the city of Joao Pessoa.

Interpol, Brazilian police, the US DEA and FBI, and Italy’s paramilitary Carabinieri all played a role in the arrest.

Rocco Morabito is the alleged head of the Ndrangheta crime organization.
Rocco Morabito is the alleged head of the Ndrangheta crime organization.
AFP/Getty Images
Multiple law enforcement agencies worked to make the arrest happen.
Multiple law enforcement agencies worked to make the arrest happen.
AFP/Getty Images
Rocco Morabito's home where he lived in the luxury resort town of Punta del Este, Uruguay.
Rocco Morabito’s home where he lived in the luxury resort town of Punta del Este, Uruguay.
Uruguay Interior Ministry via AP
Rocco Morabito has been wanted in Italy for 26 years.
DAPRESS/SplashNews.com
Rocco Morabito was the No. 2 most dangerous person on the loose from Italy.
Marcelo Umpierrez/AP
 Montevideo's Central Prison, where Rocco Morabito escaped from in 2019.
Montevideo’s Central Prison, where Rocco Morabito escaped from in 2019.
Miguel Rojas/AFP via Getty Images

“Once again, the determination, dedication and professionalism of all the investigators involved helped bring to justice, after two years of complex and detailed investigation, the leading exponent of the ’Ndrangheta,” Interior Minister Luciana Lamorgese, Italy’s top security official, said in a statement.

The ‘Ndrangheta mafia is thought to control about 80 percent of Europe’s cocaine trade, according to the BBC.

Morabito is considered the Italy’s second-most dangerous fugitive, behind Sicilian mob boss Matteo Messina Denaro, who has been on the lam since 1993.

With AP wires

This article was originally posted here

With Plea Deal Secured, Canadian Mobster Dodges The Pen, Takes Life In Own Hands On The Street

May 25, 2021 – Pino Avignone avoided death. Then, he avoided the can.

Hamilton (ON) mob figure Joe (Pino) Avignone escaped a prison sentence last week by pleading guilty to fraud in relation to writing bad checks worth close to $400,000 at an Ontario convenience store. Instead, he’ll serve four years of probation. Avignone, 60, was a first cousin and surrogate sibling to the slain Musitano brothers, killed in the still ongoing Great Canadian Mob War.

Hamilton mafia don Pasquale (Fat Pat) Musitano was gunned down in Burlington, Ontario furniture store parking lot on July 10, 2020. Avignone was wounded in the attack. As was Musitano’s aging driver and bodyguard, John (The British Bulldog) Clary, who ran after the getaway vehicle and exchanged gunfire with the shooter. Six days after Fat Pat’s assassination, Avignone’s house was vandalized and the word “RAT” was spray-painted on his garage

Pino Avignone was adopted by the Musitano family in the 1970s and raised with Fat Pat and his younger sibling Angelo (Big Ange) Musitano, as brothers. Big Ange Musitano was killed in 2017. The 78-year old Clary, born in Great Britain, was a longtime aide-de-campe for the Musitanos’ father, Hamilton mob boss Dominic Musitano, who died of a heart attack in 1995.

According to court records and RCMP documents, Pino Avignone runs his affairs out of Monello’s Sports Club in Hamilton’s East End and has been involved narcotics and illegal gambling. In the 1980s, he did five years in prison for a murder conspiracy and his role in the 1983 gangland hit of Toronto mob prince and drug-addled playboy Domenic Racco.

Clary is the Musitano crime family’s go-between with the Buffalo mafia across the border in the United States, per DEA records. With support from Montreal’s Rizzuto crime family, the Musitano brothers pushed the Buffalo mob’s Hamilton crew out of the way in a hostile takeover that took place in the late 1990s. They both did a half-dozen years in prison for a number of murders connected to the local mob strife at the time.

The underworld in Canada erupted into chaos in the years following crime lord Vito Rizzuto’s imprisonment. The violence and struggle for power started in Montreal in the late 2000a and eventually moved to Ontario by the end of the decade. The Musitanos had walked free from prison in 2006.

Due to the unrest in the Montreal underworld for the past decade and their alliance with the under-siege Rizzuto mob empire, the Musitano brothers and their allies found themselves in the middle of the crossfire: On May 2, 2017, Big Ange Musitano was murdered in his driveway. Last summer, Clary rammed his car into a rival mobster’s vehicle outside of Fat Pat Musitano’s home thinking that it was an ambush. Months earlier, Fat Pat survived an early-morning assassination attempt outside his attorney’s office near Toronto.

Sources in law enforcement say Pino Avignone and John Clary have been keeping a low profile since surviving the hit on Fat Pat last summer. Clary now drives for Avignone when they do decide to venture out.

This article was originally posted here