Author: William

On The River: Fmr. Elder Statesman In Springfield Mob Linked To ’72 Slaying According To Unearthed Police File



August 9, 2020 – It hasn’t been a great few years for longtime Springfield (MA) mob figure Amedeo Santaniello. A shelving by Genovese crime family bosses in New York due to a photo that surfaced on-line of him posing beside black-listed informant mob soldier Felix Tranghese, a beef with his nephew, reputed Springfield mafia crew skipper Albert (The Animal) Calvanese and now implication in a cold-case gangland murder conspiracy from nearly a half-century ago.

In a meticulously-researched two-part investigative piece by Springfield’s resident mob expert Stephanie Barry posted on MassLive last week, it was reported that Santaniello summoned his close friend, fellow hood and bar co-owner Victor DeCaro on the night he disappeared in the spring of 1972. The 29-year old DeCaro’s slaying is one of the most infamous unsolved crimes in the history of the region. He was found floating in the Connecticut River two months later, his body riddled with bullets.

DeCaro was married to the daughter of Springfield mob underboss Frank (Frankie Skyball) Scibelli and rumored to be having an affair with the wife of Springfield mafia don Salvatore (Big Nose Sam) Cufari. The DeCaro hit was one of three murders in May 1972 that were carried out using the same .38 caliber Smith&Wesson pistol according to Barry’s article.

On the evening of May 14, DeCaro was with Scibelli at Big Nose Sam’s South End neighborhood headquarters, Ciro’s, when Santaniello called the kitchen phone at Ciro’s and requested DeCaro come by their Living Room Lounge on the Agawam riverfront to replace a sick bartender, per a miniscule police file on the case Barry got her hands on. Scibelli drove DeCaro to the Living Room Lounge that night and he was never seen alive again.

Cufari led the mob in Springfield – a satellite wing of New York’s Genovese clan – for more than three decades until he died of natural causes in 1983 and Frankie Skyball took over his post. Santaniello, 81, was Scibelli’s policy lottery chief and oversaw gambling territory in parts of New York for the Springfield crew well into the 1990s. He was kicked out of town late in the decade after he had a huge falling out with his best friend Scibelli’s No. 2 man, Adolfo (Big Al) Bruno and lived in exile in Florida.

According to sources, Santaniello, Bruno and DeCaro comprised a a tight-knit clique of young wiseguys on the come-up in the Springfield mob of the 1960s and early 1970s. Bruno became boss of the Springfield mob crew following Scibelli’s retirement and subsequent passing  in the early 2000s, but he was assassinated in a plot hatched by his protégé Anthony (Bingy) Arrillota in 2003 and Santaniello was brought back into the fold by Arrillota, a friend of Santaniello’s son, Ralphie, to be an advisor, per FBI documents.

Arrillota flipped in 2010 and by the mid 2000s the Santaniellos and Amedeo’s nephew, ferocious loan shark Albert Calvanese had assumed power, according to sources. Calvanese bullied his way to the top spot in the crew after Ralphie was arrested and jailed for extortion in 2016 and he quarreled with Calvanese, per sources familiar with the situation.

Amedeo Santaniello was put on the shelf in 2018, according to sources, when a photo of him and Felix Tranghese smiling next to each other at a Springfield pizzeria appeared on Instagram. Tranghese, along with Arrillota, testified against the sitting administration of the Genovese crime family in 2012 at the trial of acting boss Arthur (Little Artie) Nigro and his cabinet. Nigro, who died of cancer last year, ordered Santaniello’s shelving, sources claim. Ralphie Santaniello, 53, just got out of prison on parole.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/on-the-river-fmr-elder-statesman-in-springfield-mob-linked-to-72-slaying-according-to-unearthed-police-file/

Philly Mobster “Danny D” Indicted For Fraud, Dad Once Forked Over Cash To Block Contract On His Head



August 9, 2020 – South Philly’s biggest bookmaker of the late 1990s, Daniel (Danny D) D’Ambrosia, a high-level mafia associate in the Natale era of the Bruno-Scarfo crime family, is back in trouble with the law.

Not so long ago, he was in trouble with the mob and, according to sources, his father paid a large sum of money to save his life.

The 56-year old D’Ambrosia was indicted this summer on five counts of wire fraud, bankruptcy fraud and tax evasion. His alleged criminal activity is tied to his ownership interests in two Pennsylvania businesses, Danco Painting and Jardel Construction. He pleaded not guilty earlier this month and is out on bond awaiting trial.

Award-winning television investigative reporter Dave Schratwieser broke the news of Danny D’s bust on his Philly Mob Sit Down blog and social media accounts. D’Ambrosio’s bond was set at $20,000. Sources claim D’Ambrosio has worked with mob in New York recently.

D’Ambrosia was nailed in a 2000 racketeering bust that took down the sitting administration of the Philadelphia mafia. In the months before his arrest in the case, Danny D was part of a plot to murder then Philly mob acting boss Joseph (Uncle Joe) Ligambi, per court testimony and FBI records. In 2002, he pleaded guilty to bookmaking charges and served a little less than three years in a federal correctional facility.

Per Ligambi himself in bugged conversations, D’Ambrosia’s father approached Uncle Joe worried that Danny D was going to be killed in retribution. Money was extorted from the D’Ambrosias to prevent that from happening, according to sources familiar with the “life-or-death” shakedown.

In past years, because of his prolific earning as a bookie, Danny D had the upper echelons of the crime family doing favors for him, instead of the other way around.

Although D’Ambrosia wasn’t a “made man,” he rose to become the right-hand man to don Ralph Natale, who led the mafia in Philadelphia from 1994 until he turned government in the fall of 1999. D’Ambrosia ran his massive boomaking operation out of his Talk of The Town cheesesteak joint. Danny D was with Natale when Natale was taken into custody by FBI agents in June 1998 outside his Pennsauken, New Jersey luxury condo for violating his parole.

With Natale off the street, current Bruno-Scarfo boss Joseph (Skinny Joey) Merlino seized control of the mob and hasn’t let go since. Merlino had met Natale in prison and they teamed to defeat Sicilian Godfather John Stanfa in a brazen mob war fought in the early 1990s. The old-school Natale gave young buck Skinny Joey credibility and Merlino and his tight-knit crew of childhood pals provided Natale muscle.

But the alliance frayed and Merlino pushed Natale out of the way and cut him off financially upon Natale being nailed for associating with known felons in the summer of ’98. Stewing behind bars and facing a drug case, Natale angled to get even with Merlino.

First, he joined Team USA and agreed to testify against Merlino.  Simultaneously, according to sources, he helped D’Ambrosio and North Jersey capo Peter (Pete the Crumb) Caprio, plan a palace coup that would have removed a jailed Merlino from power and killed three of his closest allies, including Uncle Joe Ligambi, his then acting skipper.

Caprio was nailed and flipped before it could happen and spilled the details on the plotted insurrection. Getting backing from the Genovese and Gambino crime families in New York and allegedly with urging from Natale behind bars in the midst of aiding the FBI in building a case against the entire Merlino camp, Caprio intended on arranging a meeting with Ligambi, Merlino’s underboss Steven (Handsome Stevie) Mazzone and Merlino’s consigliere, George (Georgie Boy) Borgesi in Trenton, New Jersey and having them slain and buried in a nearby landfill.

D’Ambrosia was relaying messages from Natale to Caprio throughout the fall of 1999 and winter of 2000 regarding the plot and was promised to be named Caprio’s underboss if they were successful in wrangling control of the Bruno-Scarfo clan. Caprio told investigators in his spring 2000 debriefing that Merlino’s buddy Marty Angelina would have been given the consigliere post and used to reel in the remaining Merlino guys back into the fold under new leadership.

Whether Angelina was involved in the plot is unknown. Angelina eventually rose to underboss for a brief time in the late 2000s under Ligambi, representing Merlino’s interests on the street while Skinny Joey finished his prison sentence.

The Merlino crew was all convicted of racketeering and did federal prison time. Merlino, 58, relocated to South Florida after getting released. These days, Ligambi, 81, is retired and Borgesi, Uncle Joe’s nephew, is Merlino’s acting boss.

Prior to heading off to prison to serve his time in 2003, D’Ambrosia went into damage control mode, per sources, worried about his personal safety. According to sources and FBI records, Danny D met with Ligambi on more than one occasion to explain himself when news of Danny D taking Natale’s calls from prison and liaisoning with Pete the Crumb, making the case that he was just placating an aggrieved Natale so that Natale wouldn’t give him up to the feds.

Ligambi was overheard discussing Danny D’s father approaching him to bargain for his son’s life at a 2010 meeting with Gambino crime family members at a posh Italian eatery in Kenilworth, New Jersey that was recorded by a Gambino turncoat. Danny D had some gambling interests with the Gambinos by that point, per sources.

“He comes over to my house three or four years ago, he said the FBI says you’re going to kill my kid. He’s telling me this on my front steps, I said ‘what the fuck are you talking about…don’t ever come around my house again.’ These are the kind of nuts I’m dealing with.”

According to sources familiar with the situation, he did come back though. D’Ambrosia sent somewhere between $100,000 and 250,000 in multiple installments to Ligambi to keep a murder contract from being placed on his son’s head for his previous indiscretions, per these sources. On at least one occasion, Danny D’s dad delivered an installment to Ligambi at his house himself, two sources claim. The money, according to the sources, was divvied up between Ligambi, Merlino, Mazzone and Borgesi.

Last summer, Borgesi, 56, reportedly replaced Ligambi as acting boss of the Philly mob at Ligambi’s 80th birthday party. Merlino just got out of a short prison term for a gambling conviction. One of Borgesi’s men, Anthony (Tony Mortgage) Ambrosia, copped a plea to wire fraud, money laundering and identity theft for stealing $210,000 last week.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/philly-mobster-danny-d-indicted-for-fraud-dad-once-forked-over-cash-to-block-contract-on-his-head/

Big Meech Won’t Be Coming Home Anytime Soon, Federal Judge In Detroit Denies Him An Early Release



August 9, 2020 – The silence was deafening. Black Mafia Family boss Demetrius (Big Meech) Flenory was quietly denied his motion for compassionate release last week by U.S. District Court Judge David Lawson in Detroit.

A non-violent offender, Flenory, 51, argued he was in danger of contracting the COVID-19 virus due to underlining health issues (hypertension, high cholesterol) and should be sprung 12 years early from his 30-year prison sentence for heading the biggest domestic narcotics-trafficking organization in American history. Big Meech and his younger brother Terry (Southwest T) Flenory, were busted in the groundbreaking 2005 Operation Motor City Mafia case after making hundreds of millions of dollars, embedding itself in hip-hop culture and transforming the U.S. cocaine-distribution market.

The Flenory brothers founded BMF in their hometown of Detroit in 1990 and grew it to a nationwide powerhouse, expanding into dozens of states around the country by the early 2000s. Big Meech headquartered out of Atlanta.

Terry Flenory, 50, was granted a compassionate release back in the spring, six years prior to his scheduled walk date. He ran BMF’s Motown affairs from Los Angeles at the group’s apex. Southwest T is finishing out his sentence on home confinement in the Motor City at his mother’s house.

As of right now, Big Meech’s release date is in October 2032. Rap mogul 50 Cent is making a scripted television series based on the Flenorys and the rise and fall of BMF. The show will be on the Starz cable network where 50 Cent executive produced and co-starred in the smash hit fictional New York drug-world drama, Power, starring Omari Hardwick.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/big-meech-wont-be-coming-home-anytime-soon-federal-judge-in-detroit-denies-him-an-early-release/

This wanted mobster ‘killed enough people to fill a small cemetery’

Few would recognize Matteo Messina Denaro on the street, but the Cosa Nostra leader is one of the most sought-after fugitives on the planet.

His reign of terror amped up in 1993, after authorities tracked down and arrested Sicilian mafia boss Salvatore “Toto” Riina, who had spent 23 years on the lam, in Palermo, Italy. Soon after, his protégé Denaro allegedly played a key role in making sure there would be hell to pay for the pinch.

The revenge run was “an attack on Italy [and] Denaro’s craziest crime,” Cyprien d’Haese, co-director of a new episode of Netflix’s “World’s Most Wanted” that dropped Wednesday, told The Post. Denaro and his blood-thirsty crew “put bombs in Milan, Rome and Florence. They blew up national monuments and a museum,” d’Haese added. “It was their way of saying, ‘We are so powerful. We can get anyone anywhere.’ ”

A precociously violent “baby-killer who learned to use a gun at the age of 14,” according to ­d’Haese, Denaro allegedly assumed the godfather mantle in 2007, following the arrest of previous leader Bernardo Provenzano.

Matteo Messina Denaro
Matteo Messina DenaroCourtesy of Netflix

Denaro is a handsome ladies man, whose tinted shades hide slightly crossed “feline eyes.” He is said to be worth billions, favors fancy wristwatches, owns a pack of Porsches and strictly avoids the camera lens.

He’s been running since the ’93 bombings and, as an Italian law enforcer said on the show, “Matteo Messina Denaro is the most wanted fugitive in the Cosa Nostra.” His specialties? Homicide, arson and terrorism. He’s even earned the nickname Diabolik, ripped from an unscrupulous Italian comic-book criminal.

It’s a role that Denaro, 58, was born to play. His father, a high-ranking mafioso, handed him over to Riina for a bloody apprenticeship that began around his 18th birthday. Denaro quickly established himself as a reliable foot soldier with a penchant for murder. “Riina loved him,” said d’Haese. “Denaro was told to kill and he killed.”

The documentary claims that Denaro brags about having “killed enough people to fill a small cemetery.” Among his victims: the young boy of a turncoat who seemed poised to testify against the mob, and a hotel manager with an eye for a woman whom Denaro fancied. He even had a hand in murdering a pair of anti-Mafia judges. As one of them drove home from an airport in Sicily, a stretch of highway was blown up beneath him. The job was said to have taken 1,100 to 2,000 pounds of explosives.

With a scary reputation that keeps people in line — when authorities arrested Denaro’s girlfriend and sister, they both did their time and stayed mum about Diabolik — he’s said to masterfully manage a core mob business. The UK Daily Mirror describes Denaro as the mastermind of heroin and cocaine importation into Europe from South America.

A computer rendition (right) of what Italian mafia fugitive Matteo Messina Denaro may look like in recent years, as compared to an old photo taken of him, July 4, 2011.
A computer rendition (right) of what Italian mafia fugitive Matteo Messina Denaro may look like in recent years, as compared to an old photo taken of him, July 4, 2011.REUTERS

He’s also muscled his way into legit industries such as green ­energy and online gambling, both of which he’s used to earn profits and launder dirty money.

A few years ago, according to d’Haese, a judge tried to prove that Denaro owns a Sicilian chain of supermarkets. “Some people say he creates jobs by running legitimate businesses,” said the documentary director. “But Denaro has too much blood on his hands to be legitimate.”

For all of Denaro’s money and power and fearsomeness, is he living like the rich and famous? Is it good to be a kingpin? “People say he does not have a good life,” d’Haese told The Post. “They think he is on a small farm, hiding and frightened. He cannot have a good life because so many people are after him.”

Original Post https://nypost.com/2020/08/08/wanted-mobster-killed-enough-people-to-fill-a-small-cemetery/

Philly Mob Figure “Danny D” Indicted For Fraud, Dad Forked Over Cash To Block Contact On His Head



August 8, 2020 – South Philly’s biggest bookmaker of the late 1990s, Daniel (Danny D) D’Ambrosia, a high-level mafia associate in the Natale era of the Bruno-Scarfo crime family, is back in trouble with the law.

Not so long ago, he was in trouble with the mob and, according to sources, his father paid a large sum of money to save his life.

The 56-year old D’Ambrosia was indicted this summer on five counts of wire fraud, bankruptcy fraud and tax evasion. His alleged criminal activity is tied to his ownership interests in two Pennsylvania businesses, Danco Painting and Jardel Construction. He pleaded not guilty earlier this month and is out on bond awaiting trial.

Award-winning television investigative reporter Dave Schratwieser broke the news of Danny D’s bust on his Philly Mob Sit Down blog and social media accounts. D’Ambrosio’s bond was set at $20,000.

D’Ambrosia was nailed in a 2000 racketeering bust that took down the sitting administration of the Philadelphia mafia. In the months before his arrest in the case, Danny D was part of a plot to murder then Philly mob acting boss Joseph (Uncle Joe) Ligambi, per court testimony and FBI records. In 2002, he pleaded guilty to bookmaking charges and served a little less than three years in a federal correctional facility.

Per Ligambi himself in bugged conversations, D’Ambrosia’s father approached Uncle Joe worried that Danny D was going to be killed in retribution. Money was extorted from the D’Ambrosias to prevent that from happening, according to sources familiar with the “life-or-death” shakedown.

In past years, because of his prolific earning as a bookie, Danny D had the upper echelons of the crime family doing favors for him, instead of the other way around.

Although D’Ambrosia wasn’t a “made man,” he rose to become the right-hand man to don Ralph Natale, who led the mafia in Philadelphia from 1994 until he turned government in the fall of 1999. D’Ambrosia ran his massive boomaking operation out of his Talk of The Town cheesesteak joint. Danny D was with Natale when Natale was taken into custody by FBI agents in June 1998 outside his Pennsauken, New Jersey luxury condo for violating his parole.

With Natale off the street, current Bruno-Scarfo boss Joseph (Skinny Joey) Merlino seized control of the mob and hasn’t let go since. Merlino had met Natale in prison and they teamed to defeat Sicilian Godfather John Stanfa in a brazen mob war fought in the early 1990s. The old-school Natale gave young buck Skinny Joey credibility and Merlino and his tight-knit crew of childhood pals provided Natale muscle.

But the alliance frayed and Merlino pushed Natale out of the way and cut him off financially upon Natale being nailed for associating with known felons in the summer of ’98. Stewing behind bars and facing a drug case, Natale angled to get even with Merlino.

First, he joined Team USA and agreed to testify against Merlino.  Simultaneously, according to sources, he helped D’Ambrosio and North Jersey capo Peter (Pete the Crumb) Caprio, plan a palace coup that would have removed a jailed Merlino from power and killed three of his closest allies, including Uncle Joe Ligambi, his then acting skipper.

Caprio was nailed and flipped before it could happen and spilled the details on the plotted insurrection. Getting backing from the Genovese and Gambino crime families in New York and allegedly with urging from Natale behind bars in the midst of aiding the FBI in building a case against the entire Merlino camp, Caprio intended on arranging a meeting with Ligambi, Merlino’s underboss Steven (Handsome Stevie) Mazzone and Merlino’s consigliere, George (Georgie Boy) Borgesi in Trenton, New Jersey and having them slain and buried in a nearby landfill.

D’Ambrosia was relaying messages from Natale to Caprio throughout the fall of 1999 and winter of 2000 regarding the plot and was promised to be named Caprio’s underboss if they were successful in wrangling control of the Bruno-Scarfo clan. Caprio told investigators in his spring 2000 debriefing that Merlino’s buddy Marty Angelina would have been given the consigliere post and used to reel in the remaining Merlino guys back into the fold under new leadership.

Whether Angelina was involved in the plot is unknown. Angelina eventually rose to underboss for a brief time in the late 2000s under Ligambi, representing Merlino’s interests on the street while Skinny Joey finished his prison sentence.

The Merlino crew was all convicted of racketeering and did federal prison time. Merlino, 58, relocated to South Florida after getting released. These days, Ligambi, 81, is retired and Borgesi, Uncle Joe’s nephew, is Merlino’s acting boss.

Prior to heading off to prison to serve his time in 2003, D’Ambrosia went into damage control mode, per sources, worried about his personal safety. According to sources and FBI records, Danny D met with Ligambi on more than one occasion to explain himself when news of Danny D taking Natale’s calls from prison and liaisoning with Pete the Crumb, making the case that he was just placating an aggrieved Natale so that Natale wouldn’t give him up to the feds.

Ligambi was overheard discussing Danny D’s father approaching him to bargain for his son’s life at a 2010 meeting with Gambino crime family members at a posh Italian eatery in Kenilworth, New Jersey that was recorded by a Gambino turncoat.

“He comes over to my house three or four years ago, he said the FBI says you’re going to kill my kid. He’s telling me this on my front steps, I said ‘what the fuck are you talking about…don’t ever come around my house again.’ These are the kind of nuts I’m dealing with.”

According to sources familiar with the situation, he did come back though. D’Ambrosia sent somewhere between $100,000 and 250,000 in multiple installments to Ligambi to keep a murder contract from being placed on his son’s head for his previous indiscretions, per these sources. On at least one occasion, Danny D’s dad delivered an installment to Ligambi at his house himself, two sources claim. The money, according to the sources, was divvied up between Ligambi, Merlino, Mazzone and Borgesi.

Last summer, Borgesi, 56, reportedly replaced Ligambi as acting boss of the Philly mob at Ligambi’s 80th birthday party. Merlino just got out of a short prison term for a gambling conviction. One of Borgesi’s men, Anthony (Tony Mortgage) Ambrosia, copped a plea to wire fraud, money laundering and identity theft for stealing $210,000 last week.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/philly-mob-figure-danny-d-indicted-for-fraud-dad-forked-over-cash-to-block-murder-contact-on-his-head/

Stream It Or Skip It: ‘World’s Most Wanted’ On Netflix, A Docuseries About The Planet’s Most Notorious (And Elusive) Criminals

The five-episode first season of World’s Most Wanted discusses five notorious criminals from around the world, the heinous crimes they committed, and why they’ve been so hard to capture. The first segment, directed by Paul Moreira, is devoted to Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada Garcia, the brains in charge of the Sinaloa drug cartel.

Opening Shot: “SINALOA MOUNTAINS, MEXICO.” A shot of the brown and green terrain of the Sinaloa Mountains. “FEBRUARY 13th, 2014”.

The Gist: Most people know about the Sinaloa cartel, based in the Mexican state of the same name, from Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, who is currently serving a life sentence at a supermax federal prison in Colorado. But El Chapo was merely the face of Sinaloa, the salesman who went out and made the massive deals that sent the cartel’s product throughout North America. El Mayo was the one who was in charge of the cartel’s business affairs, and kept a far lower profile than his literal partner in crime.

Through interviews with retired DEA agents that were assigned to bring down Sinaloa, as well as Mexican journalists who covered the cartels closely, we get a picture of El Mayo, who never did anything that could directly tie him to a sale or any other criminal activity, often acting through intermediaries. He drove pickup trucks, and even soldiers who are in the field — some of which are also interviewed, albeit with their faces covered — never were even allowed to refer to him by name.

The first episode documents how both El Mayo’s brother and son managed to get captured by Mexican authorities, and how the DEA pretty much put Mayo’s son, Vicente Zambada Niebla, between a rock and a hard place: A life sentence or give up operational details of Sinaloa. Through intermediaries, the feds got El Mayo on the phone, who told his son to do what he has to do to preserve his family. That’s why Vincente got only 15 years. But hundreds of Sinaloa bigwigs got rounded up, and Vincente’s information led to El Chapo’s recapture. However, El Mayo is still at large and Sinaloa still operates, to the point where, in 2019, Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador stated that he was looking for peace with the cartels instead of war.

World's Most Wanted
Photo: Courtesy of Netflix

Our Take: We were wondering why the first episode of World’s Most Wanted was about El Mayo; after all, it’s not like Netflix isn’t full of shows, both fictional and factual, about Mexican narcos and the law enforcement officials who were after them. It felt like the episode was running over information that can be found elsewhere. In fact, we’re pretty sure that one of the ex-DEA agents interviewed, Jack Reily, has been on other docuseries explaining how the feds went after the cartels.

Because of this, the first episode held little in the way of surprising information. But the episode moved quickly, with lots of archival shots of bloody bodies and shootouts, including the raids that got various cartel bigwigs. What we’re hoping is that the combination of fast-paced editing along with well-sourced archival footage will help the show’s other episodes shine.

The other episodes examine the man who was the financier of the Rawandan genocide, the last boss in the Cosa Nostra crime organization, the White Widow, and a notorious Russian mafia boss. Those four cases are a bit less familiar to North American audiences than El Mayo’s case was, and it should elicit more interesting and informative episodes than the first one was.

Sex and Skin: Nothing.

Parting Shot: El Mayo’s soldiers make meth, and the leader says that no matter who gets arrested, someone else will always be there to take his place, and SInaloa will just get stronger.

Sleeper Star: None.

Most Pilot-y Line: For a show that’s rated TV-14, there is an awful lot of archival footage of bloodied bodies and people hanging from bridges. Not sure how seeing that much gore only rates a TV-14.

Our Call: STREAM IT. We’re giving World’s Most Wanted a marginal recommendation because it’s slickly edited and does have great archival footage. We’re hoping, though, that the other episodes are more interesting and less repetitive than the first one was.

Joel Keller (@joelkeller) writes about food, entertainment, parenting and tech, but he doesn’t kid himself: he’s a TV junkie. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Slate, Salon, VanityFair.com, Playboy.com, Fast Company.com, RollingStone.com, Billboard and elsewhere.

Stream World’s Most Wanted On Netflix

Original Post https://decider.com/2020/08/05/worlds-most-wanted-netflix-stream-it-or-skip-it/

Chicago Mafia Bigwig Fat Mike Sarno Gunning For Early Release From Prison On COVID-19 Concerns



August 5, 2020 – Jailed Chicago mob boss Michael (Fat Mike) Sarno is seeking a reprieve from his 25-year federal prison sentence for extortion because of the Coronavirus. Sarno, 62, has an array of physical ailments and wants to come home 12 years early on a compassionate release. His attorney filed the motion Monday.

Last month, U.S. District Court Henry Leinenweber let Chicago Outfit soldier Mario (The Arm) Rainone out of prison eight years early on an identical motion. The 65-year old Rainone was convicted on a gun charge.

Sarno ran the Outfit on a day-to-day basis from 2005 until he was found guilty of fire-bombing a rival video-poker machine company in Berwyn, Illinois at a December 2010 trial. The motion for compassionate release lists lung, liver, prostate, gallbladder and high blood pressure issues. Due to the need for a double knee replacement, the motion reads, Sarno is confined to a wheelchair.

Hailing from the Chicago mob’s Cicero regime, Sarno came up under deceased Outfit capo Ernest (Rocky) Infelise. Sarno was busted with Infelise’s “Good Ship Lollipop” crew in 1990 and did seven years behind bars for racketeering. He took command of the Cicero crew in around 2000.

Following Chicago mob street boss James (Jimmy the Man) Marcello being nailed in the landmark Operation Family Secrets bust, Sarno was given the post. According to federal records, Sarno is suspected of ordering the 2006 kidnapping and murder of Outfit underboss Anthony (Little Tony) Zizzo, Marcello’s No. 2. Sarno and Zizzo were feuding over video-poker machine routes.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/chicago-mafia-bigwig-fat-mike-sarno-gunning-for-early-release-from-prison-on-covid-19-concerns/

Ponytail Tony Parrillo Can’t Find Relief From R.I. High Court, Providence Mafia Figure’s Assault Case Stands



August 2, 2020 — The Supreme Court of Rhode Island recently upheld Providence mobster Anthony (Ponytail Tony) Parrillo’s 2015 assault conviction. Parrillo, 69, was found guilty at a bench trial for ordering the December 2011 beatdown of a man in a case of mistaken identity at Club 295 in Providence’s Federal Hill neighborhood. He’s serving a 10-year sentence in state prison

A convicted murderer and reputed high-ranking member of organized crime in New England, Parrillo operated out of the now-shuttered Club 295 in the late 2000s and early 2010s. On December 17, 2011, he had his bouncers throttle a patron named Jack Fernandes in an alley outside the establishment because he thought Fernandes had stabbed one of his employees.

In actuality, Fernandes was enjoying a night out on the town with his wife, Dr. Sumiya Majeed and was misidentified as the culprit by club security as he using the bathroom. Minutes earlier, a man had been caught having sex in the same bathroom stall Fernandes was occupying and attacked a security guard with a knife. According to court files, Parrillo restrained Majeed while Fernandes was pummeled.

Fernandez was taken to the hospital with a broken nose and several cracked ribs. The incident ended when Parrillo called his men off, reportedly saying, “Stop, no more right now, there’s too many people around, we’ll get him later.”

Months before the assault at his club in 2011, Parrillo was arrested for harassing his ex-wife. Back in 1982, he was found guilty of gangland double homicide and did a little more than a decade in prison. Parrillo killed Providence drug dealer Ronnie Leone and Leone’s friend Rudy Baronet in October 1977 in retaliation for Leone ripping Parrillo off in a cocaine deal. Baronet had driven Leone to the Parrillo’s house where they both were slaughtered.

Upon his release from prison in 1993, Parrillo went to work as a personal bodyguard and collector for Patriarca crime family underboss Luigi (Baby Shacks) Manocchio. He also secured his Teamsters union card and linked up with Providence filmmakers the Farrelly brothers, finding employment on their movie sets as a driver. Parrillo worked on the films, There’s Something About Mary (1998), Outside Providence (1999), Me, Myself and Irene (2000), Osmosis Jones (2001) and Stuck on You (2003). On the Outside Providence set, Parrillo acted as actor Alec Baldwin’s bodyguard. On the Me, Myself and Irene set, he did the same for actor Jim Carrey.

Per sources on the street and in law enforcement, Parrillo rose to consigliere of the New England mob before his Club 295 troubles derailed his ascent up the ladder of the Patriarca clan. Some local mob experts, point to Parrillo as a potential future boss or underboss of the borgata.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/ponytail-tony-parrillo-cant-find-relief-from-r-i-high-court-providence-mafia-figures-assault-case-stands/

Stanfa Era Bomb Maker In Philly Mob Won’t Be Receiving Early Release From RICO Case



August 2, 2020 – Mob explosives expert Salvatore Brunetti was denied his request for compassionate release by U.S. District Court Judge Mark Kearney in Philadelphia last week, ruling Brunetti’s violent history outweighs his health risk to the COVID-19 virus in deciding to keep him locked up.

The 73-year old Brunetti was a bomb-maker in the unstable John Stanfa regime of the Philly-New Jersey mafia of the 1990s and went down with the Sicilian don in a March 1994 RICO case. He’s slated for release in 2028.

Brunetti was one of a number of Stanfa soldiers assigned to kill upstart mob star Joseph (Skinny Joey) Merlino during a mob war pitting the young, cocky Merlino and his crew of childhood buddies against an isolated and out-of-touch Stanfa, who was appointed boss of Philadelphia by New York’s Gambino crime family but was never able to get the entire rank and file in-line behind him.

Court records tie Brunetti to plots to murder both Merlino and his then underboss Steven (Handsome Stevie) Mazzone throughout 1992 and 1993. Brunetti planned separate attacks on Merlino and his crew, one in which he plotted to use explosives, another when he thought poisoning a Merlino beverage with cyanide was the best route to go and another pair where he attempted and then aborted to shoot Merlino and Mazzone as they attended a wake at a funeral parlor.

Brunetti was sentenced to 40 years behind bars and is being housed in a New Jersey prison. Stanfa, 79, got life and is serving his time in a Pennsylvania federal correctional facility.

Skinny Joey Merlino, 58, just walked free from a two-year prison sentence on a federal gambling conviction. He’d been in a South Florida halfway house since last fall. Merlino took over the Philly mafia in the wake of Stanfa going away in his ’94 RICO bust and hasn’t relinquished the reins yet, according to federal authorities. Upon getting released from a racketeering conviction of his own in 2011, Skinny Joey relocated to Boca Raton, deciding to continue running the Bruno-Scarfo crime family through buffers, intermediaries and street bosses.

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/stanfa-era-bomb-maker-in-philly-mob-wont-be-receiving-early-release-from-rico-case/

An Ailing “Lefty” Partee Takes Shot At Freedom, Motown Street Legend Files For Compassionate Release



August 1, 2020 – Superfly era Detroit gangland figure Robert (Lefty) Partee, one of the oldest inmates in the Michigan Department of Corrections and most respected names on the streets of the Motor City even to this day despite having spent for the last four decades behind bars, is filing a motion for compassionate release. The 80-year old Lefty Partee penned the brief himself and is requesting a medical discharge from his first-degree murder sentence based on a respiratory illness predisposing him to the COVID-19 virus.

In the 1970s, Partee was a feared enforcer for crime lord Francis (Big Frank Nitti) Usher, his first cousin and boss of Detroit’s Black mob, known as the Murder Row crew. He was convicted for being one of the shooters in the famous 1979 Michigan Federated Democratic Club Massacre, a triple murder where the victims were beheaded amidst internal strife in Big Frank Nitti’s organization.

Usher was found guilty for playing a role in the massacre at his first trial, but acquitted in a 1994 retrial after having the conviction tossed on appeal. The 78-year old Big Frank Nitti, nicknamed by Italian mobsters in Detroit as a reference to “Scarface Al” Capone’s underboss, Frank (The Enforcer) Nitti in Chicago during Prohibition and a memorable character in the 1960s television show The Untouchables, died of a massive stroke this week.

Backed and financed by Detroit’s Tocco-Zerilli crime family, Usher’s Murder Row gang controlled drugs, gambling, prostitution and extortion in several African-American neighborhoods across the city. Usher was mentored in the rackets by the Giacalone brothers (Detroit mob street bosses “Tony Jack” & “Billy Jack”, who gave him his start) and the Giacalone crew used Usher and Murder Row for muscle work.

According to FBI documents, on the afternoon of July 18, 1979, Murder Row street boss Adolph (Doc Holliday) Powell summoned Usher and two of his lieutenants, William (Little Dirty) McJoy and William (The Straw Hat) Jackson, to Powell’s headquarters at the Michigan Federated Democratic Social Club in the midtown section of Detroit for a sit down. Usher’s second-in-command, James (Cool Cat) Elliott had just been locked up so his girlfriend, Joann Clark, attended the meeting in his stead.

In reality, it was an ambush. Doc Holliday was seizing power in the gang. Powell took Usher’s gun and ordered McJoy, Jackson and Clark, executed, per court testimony. Their bodies were dismembered by a giddy, drunken and cigar-chomping Powell, per police records, after Usher was forced to watch his inner circle and his best friend’s girl gunned down in cold blood.

Partee and his partner-in-crime, the equally fabled street legend James (Jimmy Red) Freeman, were accused of being the triggermen in the hit. Powell and Freeman were acquitted in the case, while Partee was found guilty.    

Original Post https://gangsterreport.com/an-ailing-lefty-partee-takes-shot-at-freedom-motown-street-legend-files-for-compassionate-release/